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Powerful drug discovery protocol for autism is accelerating the development of new treatments

  • University at Buffalo News

A sensitive and reliable new protocol for assessing social deficits in animal models of autism and certain psychiatric conditions is expediting the search for effective treatments. Developed by University at Buffalo researchers, the new protocol is described in a paper published in Nature Protocols. The work was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Nancy Lurie Marks Family Foundation.

INSAR Institute 2020 Session Recordings Are Now Available!

  • International Society for Autism Research

The INSAR Board of Directors, along with the Student & Trainee Committee, have decided to make the entire 2020 INSAR Institute Series’ recordings available to both members and non-members. All six sessions are now available for replay online.

Autism researchers map brain circuitry of social preference

  • Scripps Research

For individuals with conditions such as autism, unfamiliar social interactions can produce negative emotions such as fear and anxiety. A new study from Scripps Research reveals how two key neural circuits dictate the choice between social approach and avoidance.

NLM Family Foundation announces $1 million grant to Massachusetts Consortium on Pathogen Readiness (MassCPR) to address COVID-19 pandemic

  • NLM Family Foundation

The NLM Family Foundation (NLMFF) today announced a $1 million grant to the Massachusetts Consortium on Pathogen Readiness (MassCPR) to support its crucial work addressing the COVID -19 pandemic and pathogenic disease. MassCPR’s rapid response to the Coronavirus crisis and creation of clinical/research collaborations have been remarkable.

The grant is for support of the research and clinical priorities of the MassCPR under the direction of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the MassCPR Steering Committee. This funding will be used to support the highest priority COVID-19 related activities, particularly those with promise for novel diagnostics, therapeutics, or vaccines.

The goal of the MassCPR is to develop and invest in both the research process and supporting infrastructure to address the current global COVID-19 pandemic, and better position the Consortium for potential future outbreaks.

The initial efforts of the MassCPR are aimed at elucidating the basic biology of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and the pathogenesis of the resulting disease, developing new diagnostic tools, vaccines, and antiviral therapies, creating and using animal and other model systems, understanding disease epidemiology, and leveraging clinical expertise to improve medical management.

To learn more about MassCPR, please visit: https://masscpr.hms.harvard.edu/

To learn more about NLMFF’s COVID-19 Response Grants, please visit: https://www.nlmfoundation.org/grant/nlmff-covid-19-response-grants/

NLMFF COVID-19 RESPONSE GRANTS

  • NLM Family Foundation

The NLM Family Foundation has made grants to the following organizations in response to the COVID-19 crisis. The purpose of these grants is to rapidly deploy resources to organizations in Massachusetts working directly with communities that are significantly impacted by the coronavirus outbreak.

The Arc of Massachusetts
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston Health Care for the Homeless
Combined Jewish Philanthropies
The Greater Boston Food Bank
Harvard Medical School
Massachusetts Advocates for Children
Massachusetts General Hospital and the Lurie Center for Autism

Arc Tank 3.0 Competition Awards $250,000 to Improve the Lives of People with Disabilities

  • The Northeast ARC

Northeast Arc announced the winners of the third year of The Arc Tank competition, The Arc Tank 3.0, which was created to positively disrupt conventional methods of providing services to persons with disabilities. The winners were selected by a panel of judges who heard their pitches at an event held Nov. 19 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library. The winners are:

• AutismWorks – Developing Talent of the Future, Technical Certification and Computer Programming Training – Submitted by Interactive Media Institute of San Diego, CA
• BEAT Rockers App– Speech Practice Mobile App for Children with Speech and Development Disability – Submitted by Bridging Education and Art Together of Long Island, NY
• Creating Opportunities Through Entrepreneurial Ecosystems – Submitted by Celebrate EDU of Boulder, CO
• 4- A Club: Autism, Aging, Alexa, Access) – Submitted by New England Yachad of Brookline MA
• Fan Favorite chosen by the Arc Tank audience: L.A. Lab for Entertainment Professionals with Disabilities – Submitted by RespectAbility of LA and Rockville, MD

Each of the 2019 Arc Tank 3.0 winners addresses a crucial challenge currently facing the disability community.

The Challenge of Aging with Autism

  • Commonwealth Magazine

An op-ed titled, “The Challenge of Aging with Autism” is now online on the Commonwealth Magazine website. The op-ed is written by Jo Ann Simons, CEO of Northeast Arc and Elizabeth Zwick, Director of Community Relations at the NLM Family Foundation and highlights the upcoming Arc Tank 3.0 competition, which funds pioneering and positively disruptive ideas to enhance the lives of persons with disabilities.

Brandeis University invites applications for a faculty position in Disability Policy

The Heller School for Social Policy and Management invites applications and nominations for a faculty position in Disability Policy. Brandeis seeks a scholar whose research and teaching apply to issues of disability policy. The specific focus within this broad field is open, and applicants with expertise in areas such as health, poverty, employment, housing, civil rights, and intersectionality are welcome to apply. The Heller School is looking for candidates who are committed to the highest standards of scholarship with a record of funded research and public engagement. They hope to identify a future colleague for whom their tagline, “knowledge advancing social justice,” resonates. The open rank position carries an appointment outside the tenure structure, commensurate with the candidate’s qualifications. Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae and letter of application describing their research, teaching, policy, and practice experience. Review of applications will begin on October 15, 2019; however, applications will continue to be accepted until the position is filled. Questions about the position can be directed to Darren Zinner, PhD, Associate Dean for Academic Personnel (dzinner@brandeis.edu).

OA On Air Podcast: Aging with Autism

  • OA On Air

In a recent segment of the OA on Air podcast, NLMFF’s Beth Zwick, Program Officer and Director of Community Relations, spoke with Ann Murphy, Senior Vice President of O’Neill and Associates, about the NLMFF’s interest in focusing on Aging with Autism, and about NLMFF’s partnership with the Northeast Arc to support the Arc Tank 3.0 Competition on November 19, 2019. In the podcast, Ms. Zwick and Ms. Murphy discussed the biggest issues facing people aging with autism, and the types of innovative ideas that NLMFF is hoping will come out of the Arc Tank to address the unmet needs of older adults with autism and their families.

Objective Biometric Methods for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Nervous System Disorders

NLMFF Career Development Awardee, Elizabeth Torres, Ph.D., recently published a new textbook, “Objective Biometric Methods for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Nervous System Disorders.” The textbook provides a new and unifying methodological framework, introducing new objective biometrics to characterize patterns of sensory motor control underlying symptoms. Its goal is to radically transform the ways in which disorders of the nervous system are currently diagnosed, tracked, researched and treated. This book introduces new ways to bring the laboratory to the clinical setting, to schools and to settings of occupational and physical therapy.

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Postgraduate Courses on Autism and Related Disorders: The Genetics and Neurobiology of Language

  • CSHL Leading Strand

Why are children able to acquire highly sophisticated language abilities without needing to be taught? What are the neurobiological and neurophysiological processes that underpin human speech and language, and how do they go awry in developmental and acquired disorders? Which genetic factors contribute to this remarkable suite of human skills, and are there evolutionary precursors that we can study in their species? A unique course at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory addressed core questions about the bases and origins of speech and language, through talks, interactive sessions, keynotes, and debates, involving leading experts from a range of disciplines. The full lectures are available to be viewed on the CSHL Leading Strand website.